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  • wow, thanks for helping me realize how broken the formatting was lol
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  • No problem! You've done a great job with this website. ;-)
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  • we used perl5 heavily at my last place of work. it was an interesting language and I sometimes still miss the easy string manipulation.

    perl6 seems like an entirely unique beast, it's too bad there was such a large time gap in between 5 and 6.
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  • ...and I sometimes still miss the easy string manipulation.

    Easy string manipulation and powerful regexes are among Perl's main selling points.

    perl6 seems like an entirely unique beast, it's too bad there was such a large time gap in between 5 and 6.
    tl;dr: Perl 5 and Perl 6 are two completely different languages actively developed by their respective communities. If given the greenlight, Perl 6 will be become the "Raku programming language".

    A not so complete nor accurate history of Perl 6

    Back in 2000, Larry Wall envisioned Perl 6 as a community rewrite of Perl (or Perl 5) and it was intended to replace Perl 5. However, among many other things, the first stable release of Perl 6 took too long (the first one being on Dec. 25, 2015) and Perl 6 didn't turn down to be what many Perl 5 programmers expected it to be. Although, there might still be people who consider Perl 6 to be the replacement of Perl 5, it's agreed upon (at least by the majority) that Perl 6 and Perl 5 share some lineage but they are two completely different languages. As result, Perl 5 and Perl 6 are considered as two languages of the Perl family of programming languages.


    Now, as you may have noticed, if Perl 5 and Perl 6 are two completely different languages that are actively developed by their respective communities, wouldn't the version number in the name imply one's the successor of the other? The answer is "Yes" and given that they're both actively developed, it means Perl 6 gives people the wrong impressions:

    * They used Perl 5 and probably think that Perl 6 might not be different from it when the truth is that Perl 6 is "an entirely unique [and different] beast",
    * They see Perl 6 and think that Perl 5 is obsolete, it's not longer being improved on, it's not longer maintained, etc. when none is this true., etc.


    On the other hand, many people think that Perl 6 having "Perl" in the name causes people to turn away from it because:

    * They used Perl 5 (or earlier versions) back in pre-2000 and they didn't like it,
    * The "Perl" name carries the baggage of being linenoise, a write-only, etc. language.

    All of these reasons have prompted people to ask for a rename of Perl 6 but none has succeeded. The "renaming" debate has become so commonplace in the Perl 6 community that community members expect it to come up every 6 months (roughly).



    Fast forward to 2018, a Perl 6 core developer submitted a request to Larry Wall asking for, if not a rename, at least an alia. It suffices to say that Wall chose the alias "Raku". Nonetheless, many community members believed that it was utterly unclear how the alia should be used since there wasn't a document defining its use. They also argued
    it could be misused. At the end, the alias idea didn't stick and the core developer who submitted the request left the community. The idea of a rename has died down until...



    On August 2019, another developer submitted the Github issue "Perl" in the name "Perl 6" is confusing and irritating (which now has roughly 350 comments) in which she stated that "having two programming languages that are sufficiently different to not be source compatible, but only differ in what many perceive to be a version number, is hurting the image of both Perl 5 and Perl 6 in the world. Since the word "Perl" is still perceived as "Perl 5" in the world, it only seems fair that "Perl 6" changes its name." The proposed name was "the Camelia Programming Language" for several reasons. However, the alias "Raku" resurfaced and many people believed it was the perfect candidate for the language's new name.



    Fast forward to today, the candidate for the rename is "Raku" and if it's given the greenlight, then "the Perl 6 programming language" will become "the Raku programming language", although this time there's a clear path to the rename (Github issue) along with a SWOT analysis of the rename.
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  • btw this is far and away the highest quality comment on the site currently.
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  • It seems all the paragraphs got mangled up in my other reply. Sorry for the wall of text.
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  • i'm still trying to get the formatting just right combined w/ markup. if you added paragraphs, but the output is mangled, it is my fault not yours!

    paragraphs should display decently well.

    for


    example


    if they aren't, I messed something up.
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  • Cool! I didn't know people were doing stuff in perl
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  • Sure they are. However, remember this is Perl 6 (which will be soon renamed to Raku. Quite likely). If you're looking for Perl (or Perl 5), there's https://ieddit.com/r/perl/ or https://reddit.com/r/perl/ (more active).
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  • [deleted]
  • The short would be "No" but I guess that depends on what we consider a living programming language to be.
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