Larry Wall in favor of renaming Perl 6 to Raku
you are viewing a single comment - view all comments
  • As cc-d states, Raku is a relatively new programming language with its first stable release back in 2015 and with its second major release back in 2018. I'd daresay many people in the community use it for their personal projects but compared to other languages, its use is sporadic at a larger and corporate level. The one example I can remember from the top of my head is from Jonathan Worthington's Raku presentation about concurrency in which he discusses how his company used Raku for a client's project and how concurrency (and other Raku's features) fitted in all that. If you've some time, it's worth a watch.

    As for speed, Raku isn't as fast enough as it could theoretically be in all areas. However, speed improvements for different areas are tackled one at time and thus you'll find that it's fast enough for some things but not for others for the time being. If you want to use Raku and speed is of utmost importance, then I'd recommend you first consult the people at #perl6 IRC so you have a less nuanced approach to the problem and determine if Raku will fit the bill. As an add-on, this is another Worthington's presentation on Raku perfomance.
    3
    reply
  • AFAIK a lot of haskell guys worked on P6, but the issue is I already know haskell and while some o the grammar stuff, and I think they're doing some neat metacircular stuff in there, what is the story where I learn P6 (raku...) instead of using haskell or common lisp? The speed issue isn't so much of a problem, I'm more interested in what it makes possible.
    2
    reply
  • That's right. Audrey Tang wrote Pugs, the first implementation of Raku written in Haskell. I've linked to the repository so you might find some goodies there ;-).

    ...what is the story where I learn P6 (raku...) instead of using haskell or common lisp?
    Unfortunately, I know next to nothing about neither Haskell nor Common Lisp, thus I wouldn't be capable to provide a fair assessment. One time I tried to go over the Learn You a Haskell book but I dropped it in the first chapter. Nonetheless, I'm still interested in Haskell and will probably try to learn it in the no so distant future. Same for Common Lisp, especially the macros part. BTW, regarding macros one of the Raku core developers implemented a subset of Raku called Alma as a testbed for macros in Raku.

    There is a Haskell to Raku guide so it might give you a glimpse of what the language has to offer compared to Haskell. You might even be enticed to learn Raku and expand the guide :-)!

    Finally, I suggest you ask in either the #perl6 or #raku IRC channel. Give it a try!
    2
    reply